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OSHA Comments on Occupational Fatalities in 2018


The Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries Report, released Dec. 18, 2019, shows the rate of fatal work injuries remained unchanged in 2018.

    

Tragically, unintentional overdoses at work increased by 12 percent—the sixth consecutive annual increase and a reflection of the broader opioid crisis that our nation is facing. To combat this problem, President Trump has declared the opioid epidemic a National Health Emergency. OSHA also teamed with the National Safety Council on the release of a toolkit to help employers address opioid abuse in their workplaces and support workers in recovery.

    

Suicide at work, which increased by 11 percent in 2018, is also a tragic public health problem that can have lasting harmful effects on families, workplaces and communities. OSHA created a new webpage  (www.osha.gov/preventingsuicides) with free and confidential resources to help identify the warning signs of suicide and to help users know who and how to call for help.

    

The report also showed a 14 percent decline in work-related fatal falls from heights, the lowest total since 2013. Enforcement efforts helped abate more than 7,000 fall-related hazards in the construction industry.

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